In the 2010s, technology made creating, distributing, and listening to music easier than at any previous

In the 2010s, technology made creating, distributing, and listening to music easier than at any previous point in history. Producers and artists collaborated through the cloud, mixing styles like potions, from emo trap to EDM ballads to indie R&B to bedroom pop. A million modes of distribution meant you could hear those songs milliseconds after they were born. Artists started releasing music at an unprecedentedly rapid pace. The infinite scroll of social media made listeners insatiable. The result of all this was both a blessing and a curse: There was more great music out there than ever before, but it was nearly impossible to keep up. Here at Pitchfork, we sure tried. Here are our top 200 songs of the decade. For more about how we put together this list, read this letter from our editor-in-chief Puja Patel. And check out all of Pitchfork’s 2010s wrap-up coverage here. As sampled in Avicii’s “Levels,” Etta James’ relatively modest claim that “Oh, sometimes I get a good feeling” felt impossibly aspirational for a generation of entry-level millennials dumped into an indifferent economy. In 2011, good feelings were rare and expensive, but it was possible to get one for free vi...

OGF Article Designing Efficient Facilities in Challenging Locations

As exploration and production (E&P) projects move into more unique territories, operating companies must evaluate their projects’ infrastructures and devise strategies to sufficiently prepare for a growing energy demand. These strategies may take the form of significant upgrades to existing facilities or the construction of new facilities altogether. At the 2015 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, representatives from small private and state-owned operating companies discussed the challenges they faced with facilities design and construction, both onshore and offshore. This feature examines some of the strategies that were taken to handle those challenges. Last year, Pacific E&P finished work on a pilot for the first in-situ combustion project in Colombia, at the Quifa oil field located in the eastern part of the Llanos basin. Pacific E&P had five main objectives with the pilot. First, it wanted to evaluate the applicability of in-situ combustion in the heavy oil field. Second, it wanted to assess the impact of the reservoir heterogeneities on the process performance. Third, it sought experience and accuracy on the simulation and analytical models develo...