The UK launch comes two years after the device from Butterfly Network got clearance from the FDA, and manufacturer Butterfly Network has lofty ambitions for the device. The technology is based around an ultrasound sensor that plugs into a smartphone and uses the device’s screen to display the images. Conventional ultrasound technology is based around different sized probes that are tailored to tackle various age groups and/or parts of the body. But Butterfly’s technology allows for a single probe usable on the whole body, and an app to capture images and patient information. Butterfly’s probe houses three transducers and 10,000 sensors in a single device, and has already been approved by the FDA in 13 clinical applications, including procedural guidance, cardiac, abdominal, gynaecological, and musculoskeletal settings. Scans from the device called Butterfly iQ can be sent to a secure cloud and even to the PACS radiology software system commonly found in many hospitals. With these series of improvements compared with conventional ultrasound schemes, Butterfly’s device is less expensive at around £1,699. Butterfly’s device is competing with point of care ultrasound machines that ...