Arsenal builds a business platform in infrastructure maintenance with Seal for Life acquisition logo-pn-color logo-pn-color

Seal for Life makes protective coatings, tapes and film used in mining, oil and gas, and electrical distribution. Arsenal Capital Partners is creating another platform business, striking a deal to buy Seal for Life Industries LLC (SFL) from Berry Global Group Inc. for $328 million. The company operates in a sector focused on maintaining infrastructure, such as water and oil pipelines and power generation. Based in Stadskanaal, the Netherlands, SFL makes plastic mesh to protect pipes from rocks during backfilling, along with viscoelastic products, fused tapes and coatings that prevent corrosion, water ingress and insulation problems. Annual sales are about $120 million from operations in five countries with 380 employees. SFL adds coating solutions to New York-based Arsenal’s portfolio of products used to prolong the life and durability of infrastructure and industrial assets, Sal Gagliardo, an operating partner of Arsenal, said in a news release. “Seal for Life has an excellent market reputation for providing its customers with the highest level of performance and quality to meet stringent regulatory requirements,” Gagliardo said. “The company continues ...

By Frank DonatiAs a regulatory representative of Underwriters Laboratories of Canada (ULC), this author sees an

By Frank DonatiAs a regulatory representative of Underwriters Laboratories of Canada (ULC), this author sees an increasing number of building designers submitting plans to approving authorities with fire-resistant-rated assemblies as being “based on Design No. XXXX” instead of using the actual listed one. However, a design submitted as being “based on” is not the design “listed” by ULC. Seeing this qualifier should signify the design has been changed in some way from what is actually contained in the listing. In other words, these designs are therefore not what ULC has listed as a fire-resistant design. How can an approving authority know an assembly is accurately reflecting the exact design as tested and listed by ULC? Most building, fire, and related field officials know ULC annually publishes a Fire Resistance Directory, but not all sufficiently know how it works, how to use its contents, and what it means when a design is listed. Understanding the directory and the subject of resistance ratings, categories, and assemblies is no easy task. Different categories have to be treated as such. What may be applicable to wall assemblies may not be applicable for sprayed-applied mater...